Category: schools technology

featuring the “museum of data logging” with 20 years of school equipment

temperature sensor

Sensors to measure heat and temperature These sensors are available in all flavours to suit different applications. You should be able to decide on the type that suits whole class use and have any...

museum of data logging

Here are pictures of labs, data loggers, sensors and experiments from the 1990’s to the 2000’s. You’ll see different solutions to computers in a lab and for example, different colorimeters and different ways to...

the brilliant all-in-one printer from HP (2001)

Hewlett-Packard hp psc 950 All-in one printer, scanner, copier, fax and photo-card reader. (TES December 2001) £299 Contact: www.hp.com. Reviewed by Roger Frost Need a photo printer, flatbed scanner and fax? We’ve been through...

Apple iMac (2002)

Reviewed by Roger Frost for Times Educational Supplement April 2002Value 4* Quality 5* Fitness 5* Features 5* You will not find a tastier looking computer than Apple’s iMac. It is a sight that I’ll wager will...

monitor classroom noise

A most asked question was ‘what can I use this data logger for?’ My most used answer to this was to use it as a noise meter. When I needed the class to work,...

how to store a pH probe

I read somewhere that pH probes do not last forever and that may be so. It was certainly true for the draw full of pH probes, all left to dry, that I found and...

simple harmonic motion

Simple harmonic motion is rarely as simple as the lesson title implies. This potentiometer-based sensor measures angles as its core rotates. Attaching a ruler as shown (or hack saw blade) gives to a near-perfect...

hack for test tube holders – like no other

From Roger Frost’s austerity lab tips, when you run training days in hotels, one improvises, as this tip shows: This IKEA tea towel clip gained an unusual second life as boiling tube holder – although...

new kinds of computer mice

Mice and machines – interacting with computers (For Production Solutions Magazine November 2000) by Roger Frost Little has changed with the way that we interact with a computer. Its mouse has gained a button,...

ultra-violet sensor

Might be used for measuring the variation in UV light during the day or as meter to compare sun creams and sunglasses. UV sensors can be found in ‘wearables’ like smartbands and watches. 

position or angle sensor

This sensor allows superb and easy to do investigations into the swing of a pendulum leading on to studies of harmonic motion and damping. (See several examples nearby). It allows you to record the...

oxygen and pH sensors

oxygen sensor Sensor is used in conjunction with an oxygen electrode. Good for demonstrations where you monitor photosynthesis, fermentation or where you re-breathe the air in plastic bag.  Before you use the electrode for...

humidity sensor

A less widely used sensor that nevertheless shows interesting results when monitoring environments over time. Place one in a polythene bag with your hand, or a plant and see how the humidity changes. The...

conductivity sensor

This sensor is used in conjunction with a conductivity cell. It tends to used as a stand-alone meter to measure salinity or total dissolved solids in water. Offers some enhancement when used to monitor...

balance sensor

Balances and interfaces have for a long time tried to find a common language for talking to each other. A few systems found this and offered a balance adapter that works with your regular...

pressure sensor

A surprisingly useful sensor which is usually on the expensive side. They come in various ranges and while no single range handles all uses you can settle on a mid course. Some measure air...

light sensor & colorimeter

Often used elaborately to produce a makeshift colorimeter, the light is very useful for many biology and chemistry experiments on rates of reactions. As monochromatic light is less important with turbid solutions the makeshift...

heat flow sensor

Used to measure the flow and direction of heat through clothing or building materials. It contains countless thermistors and unlike a temperature sensor, provides readings as Watts/m2. While its classroom uses seem limited, this...